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Journal

Inspired by Japan: 3 lessons for simple living

Modern Japandi Furniture Design by Plyroom

Plyroom owner Elise had a yearning to explore Japan for as long as she can remember. You will see her approach to work, life and Plyroom’s minimalist furniture has roots in Japanese sensibilities and aesthetic principals. From Marie Kondo, traditional aesthetic principals of Wabi Sabi, the floral art form of Ikebana, or the concept of shinrin-yoku (nature therapy), Elise has coveted Japanese culture in its many forms for its fundamental reverence to understated beauty, simplicity, pragmatism and craftsmanship.

On her first (of what will be many) trips to Japan, Elise observed these principals manifested in every aspect of society. Most notably though, was a common embrace of simplicity. Upon returning to Australia, Elise has compiled three lessons for simplicity as discovered during her time spent in Kyoto, Tokyo and Takayama.

Japanese Inspired Modern Furniture Design by Plyroom Japanese Inspired Modern Furniture Design by Plyroom Japanese Inspired Modern Furniture Design by Plyroom

3 lessons for simple living

More rest, less iPhone


Unlike life at home in Melbourne, the Japanese seldom used their mobile phones whilst in public or on public transport. In fact, many commuters were asleep for the duration of their ride (a likely result of their notoriously non-existent work-life balance). A metaphor in and of itself, watching this behaviour reiterated the incredible reliance we have on our mobile phones in Australia and the importance of disconnecting more often.

Japanese Inspired Modern Furniture Design by Plyroom Japanese Inspired Modern Furniture Design by Plyroom


Minimalist design is timeless


Japanese minimalism has heavily influenced modern interior styling and Western design culture. The Japanese concept of ‘ma’ can be translated into ‘gap’, ‘space’, ‘pause’ and can be otherwise described as negative space. As beautifully stated on Wawaza, ma is ‘the silence between the notes which make the music’. The embrace of negative space and minimalism is pervasive in all aspects of life from architecture to food preparation. Ultimately, the biggest lesson learnt in Japan less is more. Less clutter. Less excess. Less technology. More simplicity. More humility. More tradition.  

Japanese Inspired Modern Furniture Design by Plyroom Japanese Inspired Modern Furniture Design by Plyroom Japanese Inspired Modern Furniture Design by Plyroom


Embrace rituals and traditions


Be it a tea ceremony, the repeat of ‘itadakimasu’ (I gratefully receive) at every meal or onsen protocol, the Japanese culture is laden with tradition. The people, both young and old, are diligently observant. In our contemporary Western society many traditions have faded into non-existence with each new generation.

Routine and rituals evoke a feeling of comfort and security in their consistency. Taking a leaf from Japanese culture I plan to create more rituals in my own life. They needn’t be spiritual, cultural or family traditions. Why not make your own? A moment of gratitude every morning. Taking 15 minutes for yourself and brewing loose leaf tea in the afternoon. What will your new traditions be?

Japanese Inspired Modern Furniture Design by Plyroom Japanese Inspired Modern Furniture Design by Plyroom

 

Are you similarly inspired by the Japanese way of life?

Discover our selection of modern furniture and minimalist storage pieces to inspire a little Japanese minimalism in your everyday…  

Flat Out Queen Bed Oh Side Table Shibui Side Table Dedo Wooden Storage Box
Flat Out Queen Bed Oh Side Table Shibui Sideboard Dedo Wooden Storage Box

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